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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)
of that are there lies told between the two nations as well? tony blair and bill clinton were close george bush and tony blair were very close. >> i looked very carefully at the relationship between tony blair and the art -- bill clinton and george of the bush. i know a lot about the bush player relationship because both were involved to drag their countries into war march 2003. thin in both cases of 20 blair and the case of george of the bush there is evidence they told a handful of lies to their public but there is no evidence they told lies to each other. they worked hand in hand to drag the united states and britain into that war. >> host: did you write this book before wikileaks started? >> yes. i began a long time ago 2003. i got a call from a man who was with "the new york times" and writing a piece for the weekend review section of the times on international wind. we had never met but he said for some reason when he thought of the subject line name popped into his head. >> host: why is that? >> guest: i am not sure. a i am somebody who is likely to believe and states ally a lot. i thought i woul
of that relationship, are there lies told between the two nations as well? >> tony blair, bill clinton, george bush, tony blair, very close. >> i looked very carefully at the relationship between tony blair and bill clinton and then tony blair and george w. bush, and i know a great deal about the bush and lawyer relationship because both of them were involved in dragging their country into the war against iraq in march of 2003. and i think in both cases both the case of tony blair and of george w. bush there is evidence they told a hand full of lies to the republics, but there is no evidence that they told lies to each other. in fact they worked hand-in-hand to drag the united states and britain into the war. >> did you write the book between -- before the wikileaks that was so? >> i began on the book a long time ago in fact in 2003 and what happened is i got a call from a man named serge in "the new york times" who was writing a piece for the review section of the times on the international alliance and he and i had never met but he said for some reason when he thought about the subject my name po
interests. >> it is sometimes said he influenced tony blair to not join the euro. >> we owe him thanks then. >> he did not have a political path. >> he switched between parties. he put his support behind tony blair and 1997 and then switched back to the tories in 2009. had he had a consistent agenda, i think it would be more dubious. >> he is the man at the top of news corp.. we know the phone hacking has taken place. these unethical practices in journalism -- how far is that culture endemic in news corp.? >> we do not know. it now looks as though the contagion is spreading to the united states, as well. again, without wishing to defend these practices, they are not confined to rupert murdoch's british papers. they are rife among all of them. the term, "journalistic ethics" is generally held to be an oxymoron. >> thank you for talking to us. let's look at some of the other stories making headlines. in india, the authorities are blaming terrorists for three explosions on wednesday in the commercial capital of mumbai. 27 killed and dozens injured. the blast was in a densely populated part of
to the last election. when are we going to see the transparency from tony blair and from gordon brown? , -- second issue, his questions about couslon. >> oder. we wan -- order. >> no one has raised a single question about coulons's conduct on downing street. there's only one party with a news international executive equipment a -- in his hand. pink, the question that he raises about my chief of staff ed llewellyn, is the leader of the opposition suggesting that he knows better than the chairman of the home affairs committee, and the cabinet secretary, than john yates, van paul stephenson, and all these people, including jeremy hayward? is he saying all those people are wrong and that he's right? that shows a staggering lack of judgment. let me desk answer the question about the resignation. , butw it's inconvenient sir paul stephenson set out to reasons for his resignation and explains why this situation was so different from downing street. most of the questions that he asked, i had already answered. the role of the teeth of staff and the role of mr. neil wallis, answered. let's be c
from tony blair and from gordon brown? second, second, second issue -- second issue, his questions about andy gillison. >> order, the house is getting overexcited again. i'm glad it's calmed down and we want to listen to what the prime minister to say. >> and he asks questions about andy coulson, no one has raised a single question about his conduct at number 10 downing street and there was only one party with a news national executive with a cloud in his head sitting in his office. third question, the questions he raising about my chief of staff edward luellen. is he honestly saying when it comes to the proposed meeting with the john yates is the leader of the opposition suggesting that he knows better than the chairman of the home secretary than the cabinet secretary than john yates and paul stevenson and all these people including jeremy hayward who by the way who worked diligently for tony blair and gordon brown. is he saying all those people are wrong and he's right? let me just answer the question about sir paul's resignation. i know he set out his resignation in detailed evi
with foreman british prime minister tony blair. good day i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the president's veto threat puts it ail one the line. no short-term deal to stave off default. battle lines are drawn. kelly o'donnell joins us from the capitol. let's talk about the pressure on the speaker of the house. he caved in saturday night after pressure from eric cantor his number two. >> eric cantor is just telling reporters here that republicans did not come to office in washington to raise taxes. cantor says that the president wants a trillion dollars in new taxes. they think that they can only move forward if changes in the tax structure would be revenue neutral. that's a tough sell. speaker boehner was praised by the president today. that was notable. the president saying he has acted in good faith and he's a good man. the nice ways of putting speaker boehner in perhaps a tougher box among the tea party republicans and some of the newer members of his caucus who have been perhaps the hardest to wrangle and predict in terms of how the leadership can line up with their own votes. the is
the former british prime minister tony blair if he knew when he was in office and whether he was personally hacked. and the obama administration responding to an attack on the united states embassy in damascus with its strongest condemnation yet of syria's president. i'm robert shapiro. over a million people have discovered how easy it is to use legalzoom for important legal documents. so start your business, protect your family, launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. from "i like you." "i really like you." "i love you." "i will always love you." and sometimes a gift says, "you mean more to me than anything else in the world." life insurance from new york life ensures your loved ones will always be taken care of, with 166 years of financial strength -- it's the most selfless gift you can give. new york life. the company you keep. it'this past year alonegift you can give. there was a 93% increase in cyber attacks. in financial transactions... on devices... in social interactions... and applications in the cloud. some companies are worried. some, not so much. thanks
you meet with tony blair or david cameron initially? >> well, on prime minister david cameron, you know, we have met, well, i read the other day that we have met 26 times, but i don't know if that is absolutely correct. i can do my best to come back to you on a exact number on that, but i am sure it is correct if that is what the prime minister's office says, but the fact is that i have is never been to downing street while david cameron has been prime minister, and yet under prime minister gordon brown and tony blair i did regularly go the downing street. >> how regularly is regularly? >> well, on prime minister gordon brown in the time that he was in downing time and while he was -- and also while he was chancellor, i would have gone maybe six times a year. >> and with tony blair, similar? >> probably similar, and maybe in the last few years a little more, but i mean, i can if you want the exact numbers, i can do my best to get that, but strangely, it was under labor prime ministers that i was a regular to downing street, and not the current administration. >> and do you think th
while david cameron has been prime minister, and yet under prime minister gordon brown and tony blair i did regularly go the downing street. >> how regularly is regularly? >> well, on prime minister gordon brown in the time that he was in downing time and while he was -- and also while he was chancellor, i would have gone maybe six times a year. >> and with tony blair, similar? >> probably similar, and maybe in the last few years a little more, but i mean, i can if you want the exact numbers, i can do my best to get that, but strangely, it was under labor prime ministers that i was a regular to downing street, and not the current administration. >> and do you think that there was a change of emphasis when you were at either the "sun" or the chief executive of "news international" because it struck me growing up that the "sun" and the "news of the world" and particularly the "sun" was a rather antiestablishment kind of publication, and always seemed to me the sort of paper that was on the side of the little person fighting the establishment. would you say that when you became editor and
cane. thank you very much. a pleasure. >>> still ahead tonight, tony blair's press secretary with a behind-the-scenes look at how the murdoch media empire had britain's most prominent politicians battling for its blessings. n e highw. how does it do that? well, to get there, a lot of complicated engineering goes into every one. like variable valve timing and turbocharging, active front grille shutters that close at high speeds, and friction reducing -- oh, man, that is complicated. how about this -- cruze eco offers 42 miles per gallon. cool? ♪ but i did. they said i couldn't fight above my weight class. but i did. they said i couldn't get elected to congress. but i did. ♪ sometimes when we touch ha ha! millions of hits! [ male announcer ] flick, stack, and move between active apps seamlessly. only on the new hp touchpad with webos. handle more than 165 billion letters and packages a year. that's about 34 million pounds of mail every day. ever wonder what this costs you as a taxpayer? millions? tens of millions? hundreds of millions? not a single cent. the united states p
prime minister tony blair. i spoke to him earlier from london. we talked about that so-called poisonous relationship. but first, i asked him how he thought murdoch handled the hearing today. >> i think what people may be a bit surprised by in terms of his whole town before the appearance of the mp" parliament, was the sense of almost being divorced from a lot of the events have been convulsing part of his company, an important part of his company here in the uk and the metropolitan police and the british government and the british political system. and yet even questions you really would have thought he would have answers to, he didn't. one point, for example, at which somebody raised -- run of the mps raised a previous select committee report into activities at his newspaper, and he honestly looked like he was being informed about this for the first time in his life. and i think people will be quite surprised by that, and i thought with james as well, although he was clearly much more on top of the detail, that he too, there are areas where frankly he should have had more to say and mo
, are there lies told between these two nations as well? tony blair, bill clinton very close, george bush, tony blair very close. >> guest: i looked very carefully at the relationship between tony blair and bill clinton and then tony blair and george w. bush. i know a great deal about the bush blair relationship because both of them were involved in dragging their countries into war against iraq in march of 2003 and i think in both cases, both the case of tony blair and the case of george w. bush, there is evidence that they told a handful of lies to their public, but there is no evidence that they told lies to each other. in fact they worked hand-in-hand to drag the united states and britain into that war. >> host: did you write this book before the wikileaks episode started? >> guest: yes, i began the book a long long time ago, in fact in 2003. what happened was i got a call from a man named search who was in with "the new york times" and was writing a piece for the week in review section of the times on international lying. he and i had never met but he said for some reason when he thought a
alister campbell, former press spokesman for former prime minister tony blair. john burns of t "new york times," and roger cohen of t "new york times" plu the editor of bloomberg business week >> we've worked non-stop on this story for two and a half years and we've concentrated our guns on the news of the world because that's where the evidence was. so i think once the judicial inquiry startsopening they're going to want ee everybody and ask very tough questions and in a sma world where people chge from one newspaper to another all the time it's likely that somof these techniques transfer from newsroom to newsroom. >> rose: we conclude with paul farmer of the harvard medical scol. he has a nookalledhaiti after the earthquake." >> i hope that this book helps contribute to a discussion about humanitarian relief, disaster response and development assistance. and i hope that people also learn something from the one experience in coordinating, somewhat aggressively, many say, humanitarian relief they've insisted if you want to work there, you have to be a part of their national plan. it
of rupert murdoch. >> tony blair called him three times in the 10 days before the war on iraq. he called him on the eve of invasion. does rupert murdoch's power over british politicians extent to american politicians as well? >> of course, i have no detailed knowledge of american politics but there's no doubt that sense fox news came on the scene, the growth of the more exotic right wing and politics, the tea party, and a lot of other shock jocks and so on, there is no doubt that their influence is on the american politicians which i deplore. he is better able to cope with murdoch than the uk. as a prime minister, you have to also ask his permission to do stuff. he has become an over might be subject. david cameron is often photographed in the company of the chief executive of mr. murdoch's executive -- and mr. murdoch's british operations. at some point, he needs to be seen off. >> we have continued fallout from this. they have identified 4000 possible phone hacking victims and hundreds more have contacted them saying that they might have been targeted. we have the latest on the investigati
remembers tony blair topping off to consort with rupert on the island and gordon brown constantly having his door open to visiting murdoch's and all of that. i do not think this is strictly a conservative-labor issue. there are those who believe david cameron should have had andy resign over the first allegations of hacking. he looks a bit stupid now. it does not do anything for his authority. uso voluble yesterday, saying that this is an outrage -- he was so valuable yesterday, saying that this is an outrage and something must be done about it. >> in other news of the world, yemeni president ali abdullah saleh has appeared on state television just months after the rocket attack on his compound that nearly killed him. he has undergone eight successful operations to treat his burns. the european central bank has raised its main interest rate by one-quarter of a percent to try to keep the lid on inflation. the rate is now 1.5%. correspondents say the decision is controversial because the country is already struggling with the government debt crisis. greece, ireland and portugal will now face h
the news of the world has gotten by hacking into the voice mail accounts by mcjager, gwyneth paltrow, tony blair, and a member of prince william's staff. but it is the intrusion into the voice mail of millie doweller that outraged a nation. the news of the world not only hacked into milly's voice mail to hear desperate relatives trying to reach her, it deleted messages to make room for others and so gaffe her family false hope she was still alive, dialing into her own voice mail. he was found six months left. >> the family, which had made heart rending appeals is distraught. >> the technique for hacking into voice mall accounts is frightening limb pl. all it takes is two phones. on one you dial the number in question. while it's busy, you dial the number again on the other phone which immediately goes to voice mail. it's a matter of dialing in the usually factory pin numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 0000. it's surprising how many people never change their pin. the scandal has business and political fallout. the news of the world is owned by rupert mer dock. now runs his operations and refused to
of surgeons, tony blair, most people working in the in a chest but not the party office. >> the prime minister should not have to shout to make himself heard. >> the whole country will have heard that he has admitted that 852 million pounds of making people redundant anti cannot say that they will not be rehired to do their old jobs. he promised a bonfire and he is paying more. teapot -- promised a better deal for the patience and things are getting worse. what is he doing for the national health service? >> what the whole country will have noticed is that at time when people are afraid of strikes, he cannot talk about this because he is in the pocket of the unions. at a time when greece's facing deficit problems, he cannot talk about this because his plan is to make great britain -- britain like greece. at the time when the economy is the key issue, he cannot talk about the economy because of his plans for tax cuts. this is what we see every week. he has a talk about the micro because he cannot talk about the macro. >> quarter. -- order, order. i asked you to reflect on what the public thinks
. >> joining me now from london is the deputy prime minister went tony blair was in power. 45 of his mobile phone messages were hacked into. this is a very sorry tale. it goes back to 2006 when your own messages were broken into. how evasive was that? >> the police kept in mind that that was so. i had to go to the court and force them to commit and setup a new inquiry. that is finding all of disinformation. the information was available before. why didn't the police act on it instead of the nine that my phone messages had been broken into? now we are learning the appalling situation of the phone's not only having messages on them, the girl found that not only were they wiped off, they were wiped off by the news of the world to add more information so they could get more stories so the man to sell it to the press. that is murder of's press. -- murdoch's press. he is now backing rebecca brooks. she is doing the inquiry. she was the editor. >> are we dealing with this situation both here and the u.s. where the murdoch news empire is very powerful as well and back there and britain, politicians
from cystic fibrosis even before his parents were given a confirmed diagnosis. brown's successor tony blair had this reaction. >> which is certainly shocking to the british people has been the absence of basic standards in the way things are done. three former employees or arrested on friday, former editor rebecca brooks is expected to be questioned by police about messages deleted from a murder to teenagers and phone. if she had initiative decency she would have resigned if only because the phone was tapped and her family was led to believe that she was still alive. the >> mother and sister of that murder teenager met with british lawmakers today and say they're still waiting to hear from the newspaper. >> newspapers downfall is being hailed by some of its targets. george michael tweeted the closing of the news of the world is a fantastic day before britain. >> baseball's answer to the slam dunk contest and home run derby, always the eve of the all-star game. here is a look at chase field in downtown in this. >> in the celebrity softball game, rickey henderson, he leads off with a ho
through the backdoor. i remember reading the diaries. he was the press spokesman for tony blair and guess what he said in his diaries. we ushered in rupert murdoch through the backdoor at number 10. this man had full and free access to the most senior individuals elected in the united kingdom. he had close relationships with the editors of his newspapers. for example, piers morgan who was the editor for 18 months in his recollection writes that rupert murdoch spoke to him at least once a week for 18 months. we have a vast contrast between a man sitting before a house of commons committee, incapable of remembering anything, and idea individuals who interacted with him remember everything is it really possible that rupert murdoch knew nothing? absolutely? rupert murdoch knew nothing, absolutely zero? and remember, he had newspapers under his control that were delivering the most spectacular stories, stories about members of the royal family asking 500,000 pounds to allow people access to prince andrew. he -- that's the sort of story that his newspaper was delivering. members of parliament,
to or meet tony blair, gordon brown and david cameron respectively? >> gosh. on the prime minister -- on the prime minister david cameron, you know, we have met -- what i read the other day we have met 26 times. i don't know if that is absolutely correct. i can do my best to come back to you on an exact number. i'm sure it is correct if that's what the prime minister's office say. the fact is i have never been to downing street while david cameron has been prime minister. yet under prime minister gordon brown and tony blair i did regularly go to downing street. >> how regular is regularly? >> on prime minister gordon brown in the time that he was in downing street, and while he was -- also while he was chance lower, i would have gone maybe six times a year. >> with tony blair? >> probably similar. in the last few years a little more. but if you want the exact numbers i can do my best to get that. but strangely, it was under labor prime ministers that i was a regular visitor to downing street and not the current administration. >> do you think that there was a change of emphasis whe
prime minister tony blair said to all of us lastight at our conservation international meeting which was despite so many of the immediate isis like the deficit and the debt in the united states, like afghanistan and iraq and somany others that are immediate in the headlines, the gravestoverall threat is the environment, as peter just described it, and particularly climate changand that's... i believe that, and that's why'm invved in it. >> rose:it's the greatest threat because it affects our life on the planet? >> yes, because it has the greatest potential to affect humanity negatively. whether... >> rose: and how are we failing in terms of government initiative? we know about copenhagen, we know about cancun, we know about a whole range of sort of rhetoric focused on the issue. what's the reality of how governments are responding to the crisis you described? >> well, the reality, charlie,-- and peter should add to this-- some governments are responding impressively. i'll give you an example. norway, which has been a huge investor in thingslike anti-deforestation and other things lik
diagnosis. brown's successor tony blair had this reaction. >> i think what has shocked the british people is the absence of basic standards in the way that things are done. it >> 3/4 employees of news of the world were arrested on friday. a former editor is expected to be questioned by police about messages deleted from a murdered teenagers >> the mother and sister of the murdered teenager are still waiting to hear from the newspaper. >> there has not been an apology. >> and murdoch arrived in london on sunday and a brooks, was now the ceo of us international is his priority, this will billion dollar bid is now in jeopardy. the legal aftershocks are reaching this country. james murdoch could face prosecution under american locked for violating the foreign corrupt practices act. >> the paper is downfall is being held by some of the targets of its muckraking. george michael tweeted that closing news of the world is a fantastic day for britain. >> hey look at our extended forecast, not a lot of changes to the upcoming week. foggy mornings and fog in the afternoon, cooler temperatures, a slig
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)